TTB speaks out about gluten-free beer labeling

Wondering how your gluten-free beer is affected by the FDA and the TTB?
Gluten free beer
Last week, The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) announced that they have completed their review of the FDA’s ruling on gluten free labeling. They have updated their interim policy to remain consistent with the FDA August 2013 ruling. The important take away from their press release is their statement on misleading labeling.

Consistent with the new FDA regulations, TTB will continue to consider “gluten-free” label claims for alcohol beverages that are made from gluten-containing grains to be misleading to consumers who are seeking to avoid the consumption of gluten for health reasons. However, products made from gluten-containing grains may be labeled with a statement that the product was “Processed,” “Treated,” or “Crafted” to remove gluten, if that claim is made together with a qualifying statement that warns the consumer that the gluten content of the product cannot be determined and that the product may contain gluten.

Beer made from traditional grains have been a point of controversy in the gluten free community. The process of hydrolyzing or sufficiently fermenting the gluten-containing grians, or the use of enzymes that break down gluten, are considered by many to sufficiently remove the danger posed to anyone with a gluten reactive syndrome. However, traditional testing methods may not accurately quantify gluten content in these fermented items, and the new testing methods are still undergoing external validation.

In time, the FDA will issue a follow-up ruling on fermented beverages, and the TTB will issue its final ruling to remain consistent. The TTB press release can be found on their website, along with the full ruling.

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TTB speaks out about gluten-free beer labeling

Wondering how your gluten-free beer is affected by the FDA and the TTB?
Gluten free beer
Last week, The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) announced that they have completed their review of the FDA’s ruling on gluten free labeling. They have updated their interim policy to remain consistent with the FDA August 2013 ruling. The important take away from their press release is their statement on misleading labeling.

Consistent with the new FDA regulations, TTB will continue to consider “gluten-free” label claims for alcohol beverages that are made from gluten-containing grains to be misleading to consumers who are seeking to avoid the consumption of gluten for health reasons. However, products made from gluten-containing grains may be labeled with a statement that the product was “Processed,” “Treated,” or “Crafted” to remove gluten, if that claim is made together with a qualifying statement that warns the consumer that the gluten content of the product cannot be determined and that the product may contain gluten.

Beer made from traditional grains have been a point of controversy in the gluten free community. The process of hydrolyzing or sufficiently fermenting the gluten-containing grians, or the use of enzymes that break down gluten, are considered by many to sufficiently remove the danger posed to anyone with a gluten reactive syndrome. However, traditional testing methods may not accurately quantify gluten content in these fermented items, and the new testing methods are still undergoing external validation.

In time, the FDA will issue a follow-up ruling on fermented beverages, and the TTB will issue its final ruling to remain consistent. The TTB press release can be found on their website, along with the full ruling.

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Good news for Celiacs!

Gliadin free wheat

Here’s an interesting paper! Researchers modified wheat to reduce gliadin, and may have found something that could be A) celiac-safe and B) usable to bake bread, pasta, etc.

The original paper, published in 2010, outlines efforts in engineering wheat to remove gliadin, the culprit in wheat that directly affects Celiacs. Gil-Humanes and his team used RNA interference as the basis for their engineering. This technique suppresses a gene from creating a protein; gliadin in this case.

Francisco Barro, who was on the research team, was profiled for his continuing work in engineering Celiac-friendly grains. He presented his recent developments at Growing Voices, a conference that supports the positive impact of genetically engineering food crops.

Through efforts like this, we are coming closer to minimizing the effect of Celiac disease in day to day living. How do you see the development of Celiac-safe wheat impacting your life?

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Good news for Celiacs!

Gliadin free grains
Here’s an interesting paper! Researchers modified wheat to reduce gliadin, and may have found something that could be A) celiac-safe and B) usable to bake bread, pasta, etc.

The original paper, published in 2010, outlines efforts in engineering wheat to remove gliadin, the culprit in wheat that directly affects Celiacs. Gil-Humanes and his team used RNA interference as the basis for their engineering. This technique suppresses a gene from creating a protein; gliadin in this case.

Francisco Barro, who was on the research team, was profiled for his continuing work in engineering Celiac-friendly grains. He presented his recent developments at Growing Voices, a conference that supports the positive impact of genetically engineering food crops.

Through efforts like this, we are coming closer to minimizing the effect of Celiac disease in day to day living. How do you see the development of Celiac-safe wheat impacting your life?

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Get ready for the holidays with GlutenTox!

Gluten free holiday entertainingWe have good times with friends and family on our mind here at GlutenTox HQ. We’re sure you are looking forward to the rounds of parties, buffets and happy snacking that fill the season as much as we are.

We want to help you have an enjoyable holiday. You’ll find gluten free recipes, and a special offer on our 5- and 10-test GlutenTox Home kits in our quarterly newsletter. Happy (and safe) snacking!

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The FDA has spoken!

8220889_m73ecc7a47465

If you’ve checked your Twitter feed today, you may have noticed one trending topic: the FDA has issued a ruling defining the term “gluten-free” for voluntary food labeling. 

Here at Emport, LLC, we’re very excited about the new ruling. We know you might not have time to read all 95 pages of it, so here are a few highlights from the full document:

  • items must contain less than 20ppm gluten
  • the compliance date of the rule is next year, on August 5, 2014
  • manufacturers may use oats, provided the final product remains below 20ppm
  • manufacturers may not use ingredients derived from gluten-containing grains, if those ingredients have not been processed to remove gluten
  • manufacturers may use ingredients derived from gluten-containing grains, if those ingredients have been processed to remove gluten and the food contains less than 20ppm
  • additional guidelines will be published to assist manufacturers in compliance regarding ingredients that have been hydrolyzed or fermented
  • “FDA guidance suggets that any use of an FDA-defined food labeling claim … on restaurant menus should be consistent with the respective regulatory definitions” (page 71)
  • manufacturers may determine their own safety protocol to ensure that products are in compliance with the ruling

GlutenTox Pro and GlutenTox Sticks can help you monitor your facility’s gluten-free protocol. 

If you are a restaurant with a gluten-free menu or a manufacturer of gluten-free items and you would like to discuss how GlutenTox can fit into your safety protocol, please feel free to contact us via phone or email.

If you’d like to read the FDA’s press release, you can do so here. For the full ruling (95 pages!), click here.
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The FDA has spoken!

8220889_m73ecc7a47465

If you’ve checked your Twitter feed today, you may have noticed one trending topic: the FDA has issued a ruling defining the term “gluten-free” for voluntary food labeling.

Here at Emport, LLC, we’re very excited about the new ruling. We know you might not have time to read all 95 pages of it, so here are a few highlights from the full document:

  • items must contain less than 20ppm gluten
  • the compliance date of the rule is next year, on August 5, 2014
  • manufacturers may use oats, provided the final product remains below 20ppm
  • manufacturers may not use ingredients derived from gluten-containing grains, if those ingredients have not been processed to remove gluten
  • manufacturers may use ingredients derived from gluten-containing grains, if those ingredients have been processed to remove gluten and the food contains less than 20ppm
  • additional guidelines will be published to assist manufacturers in compliance regarding ingredients that have been hydrolyzed or fermented
  • “FDA guidance suggets that any use of an FDA-defined food labeling claim … on restaurant menus should be consistent with the respective regulatory definitions” (page 71)
  • manufacturers may determine their own safety protocol to ensure that products are in compliance with the ruling

GlutenTox Pro and GlutenTox Sticks can help you monitor your facility’s gluten-free protocol.

If you are a restaurant with a gluten-free menu or a manufacturer of gluten-free items and you would like to discuss how GlutenTox can fit into your safety protocol, please feel free to contact us via phone or email.

If you’d like to read the FDA’s full ruling, visit the Federal Register.
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If you like baking with gluten, how do you bake gluten-free?

A very overdue post today, courtesy of one of Emport LLC’s very own team members, Steph. While Steph doesn’t have any food intolerances, several of her loved ones must avoid gluten. How does she handle baking treats for them, when her usual recipes won’t work? Read on to find out!

Gluten intolerance and sensitivity has seen a huge increase in visibility and more than ever we are aware of the dietary restrictions of those in our lives. As someone who claims to have an iron stomach I cannot even imagine having to cut out something so prevalent as gluten, but having several people in my life unable to consume gluten I am interested in creating great food even they can enjoy.

I like the challenge. It’s easy to add flour to anything for the texture, but it lacks taste or even much nutritional value. So I put the flour on the top shelf and try not to reach for it. What do I reach for instead? Nut flours, egg whites, cocoa powder, powdered sugar, etc. You need fluff or volume; whipped egg whites work really well and are packed with protein. Nut flours have flavor, density, and texture while also being more nutritionally valuable than wheat flour. Powdered sugar is tasty and fluffy, but be careful about adding too much because sugar easily crystalizes to become candy-like and chewy/hard. Cocoa powder is an interesting solution.
Read More…

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Looking for GlutenTox in Canada?

Canadian Flag

We know it’s historically been difficult for those of you in Canada to access GlutenTox for your testing needs. That’s why we’re so happy to share a new website with you:

www.glutentox.net

If you are purchasing GlutenTox Home and would like it to ship to a Canadian address, you can order directly on glutentox.net and your kit will ship from Ontario to your doorstep. All quantities of test are available: the 2-test GlutenTox Home sample kit, the 5-test kit for testing a few different foods, beverages, or personal care products, and the 10-test kit for those of you who have a larger variety of testing needs.

Through the site, you’ll also be able to contract our Canadian partners to discuss using GlutenTox Pro or GlutenTox Sticks in your commercial kitchen, gluten-free foods manufacturing facility, or other professional setting.

 

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We Love Gluten-Free! Winter Newsletter

If you aren’t on our mailing list, you may not have seen our most recent newsletter. Not to fear! You can check out all the latest news about GlutenTox online.

Some highlights from our newsletter include:

  • Affiliate Action: If you think your readers, patients, clients, or friends might benefit from GlutenTox, there’s an easy way to share the news (while also earning some money yourself!). You can sign up for our affiliate program in seconds, and will be given a uniquely coded link to share with anyone and everyone gluten-free.
  • Birthday Bonus: When you sign up for our newsletter, you’re asked for your birthday. We don’t care how old you are — you can use GlutenTox Home whether you are 10 or 100 (or anywhere in between!). But, we do want to help you celebrate your special day in a gluten-free way. If you haven’t already signed up for our newsletter, you can do so here.
  • Canadian Chats: We’ll be in Toronto in early March and we would love to see you there! If you’re attending the Canadian Food Service and Restaurant Association Trade show, please do come say hi. We’ll be in the Pennsylvania Pavilion.

Well, that’s the ABCs of it! If you have news you’d like to see included in a future issue of our newsletter, use the comments form here or drop us a line to share your ideas.

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